Is it a plantar wart or a callous or a corn?

Because plantar warts on the foot are spread through viral infections, those with weakened immune systems—such as children and senior citizens—are more likely to develop these warts. While most warts are visible, some plantar warts grow inwards—due to too much pressure—and form a callus. The two most common types of plantar warts include:

While most cases of plantar warts can go away on their own with time, most people want faster relief. The goal of podiatric treatment for plantar warts is to completely remove the wart, not cover it up. Common warning signs of plantar warts include:

Your doctor can usually diagnose a plantar wart by completing a simple physical exam. He or she may remove a section of the lesion to send out for further testing.

If walking become painful or the warts are spreading, there are over-the-counter treatments available—though these often require multiple treatments and are still ineffective. When self-care and home remedies fail, visit your podiatrist. Your doctor may recommend these conservative, non-invasive treatments:

Author
Dr. Wenjay Sung

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